Essential Procrastination

This way, dear   What do I post here   Liquid poetry   

Feed your head with nonsense

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In February 2013 a meteor streaked across the Russian sky and burst in midair near Chelyabinsk. A recent Physics Today article summarizes what scientists have pieced together about the meteor, from its origins to its demise. The whole article is well worth reading. Here’s a peek:

The Chelyabinsk asteroid first felt the presence of Earth’s atmosphere when it was thousands of kilometers above the Pacific Ocean. For the next dozen minutes, the 10 000-ton rock fell swiftly, silently, and unseen, passing at a shallow angle through the rarefied exosphere where the molecular mean free path is much greater than the 20-m diameter of the rock. Collisions with molecules did nothing to slow the gravitational acceleration as it descended over China and Kazakhstan. When it crossed over the border into Russia at 3:20:20 UT and was 100 km above the ground, 99.99997% of the atmosphere was still beneath it.
Because the asteroid was moving much faster than air molecules could get out of its way, the molecules began to pile up into a compressed layer of high-temperature plasma pushing a shock wave forward. Atmospheric density increases exponentially with depth, so as the asteroid plunged, the plasma layer thickened and its optical opacity rapidly increased. About one second later, at 95 km above the surface, it became bright enough to be seen from the ground. That was the first warning that something big was about to happen. #

How often are scientific articles that gripping?! Kring and Boslough provide some excellent descriptions of the aerodynamics of the meteor and its airburst. Be sure to check it out. (Photo credit: M. Ahmetvaleev; paper credit: D. Kring and M. Boslough; via io9)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In February 2013 a meteor streaked across the Russian sky and burst in midair near Chelyabinsk. A recent Physics Today article summarizes what scientists have pieced together about the meteor, from its origins to its demise. The whole article is well worth reading. Here’s a peek:

The Chelyabinsk asteroid first felt the presence of Earth’s atmosphere when it was thousands of kilometers above the Pacific Ocean. For the next dozen minutes, the 10 000-ton rock fell swiftly, silently, and unseen, passing at a shallow angle through the rarefied exosphere where the molecular mean free path is much greater than the 20-m diameter of the rock. Collisions with molecules did nothing to slow the gravitational acceleration as it descended over China and Kazakhstan. When it crossed over the border into Russia at 3:20:20 UT and was 100 km above the ground, 99.99997% of the atmosphere was still beneath it.

Because the asteroid was moving much faster than air molecules could get out of its way, the molecules began to pile up into a compressed layer of high-temperature plasma pushing a shock wave forward. Atmospheric density increases exponentially with depth, so as the asteroid plunged, the plasma layer thickened and its optical opacity rapidly increased. About one second later, at 95 km above the surface, it became bright enough to be seen from the ground. That was the first warning that something big was about to happen. #

How often are scientific articles that gripping?! Kring and Boslough provide some excellent descriptions of the aerodynamics of the meteor and its airburst. Be sure to check it out. (Photo credit: M. Ahmetvaleev; paper credit: D. Kring and M. Boslough; via io9)

— 1 hour ago with 497 notes
Nazca Lines of Kazakhstan: More Than 50 Geoglyphs Discovered

archaeologicalnews:

image

More than 50 geoglyphs with various shapes and sizes, including a massive swastika, have been discovered across northern Kazakhstan in Central Asia, say archaeologists.

These sprawling structures, mostly earthen mounds, create the type of landscape art most famously seen in the Nazca region of Peru.

Discovered using Google Earth, the geoglyphs are designed in a variety of geometric shapes, including squares, rings, crosses and swastikas (the swastika is a design that was used in ancient times). Ranging from 90 to 400 meters (295 to 1,312 feet) in diameter, some of them are longer than a modern-day aircraft carrier. Read more.

— 2 hours ago with 264 notes
kiddybro:

poison ivy for sketch_dailies….

kiddybro:

poison ivy for sketch_dailies….

— 4 hours ago with 2473 notes

crofethr:

denali-winter:

BAM.

I have never hit reblog so fast in my LIFE.

(Source: sandandglass, via wheresmyhamlet)

— 5 hours ago with 322315 notes
#femigenderstuff 
oliviawhen:

foxadhd:

Free Dog! Neat! 

Hello new friend.

oliviawhen:

foxadhd:

Free Dog! Neat! 

Hello new friend.

(via oliviawhen)

— 7 hours ago with 5898 notes

tir-ri:

Proposal.

Alicia has had difficulties to keep her forest lush and green, since someone has been killing the trees. That’s when Everk here decided to approach her and suggest an agreement, which could benefit them both.

Inspired by a beautiful illustration made by Tove Jansson.

Painted with fine and thicker watercolors on Daler Rowney paper.

— 9 hours ago with 1763 notes
jumpingjacktrash:

notyourexrotic:


This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZPhoto credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

i love the photo, and congrats to these scientists, but wtf is with that commentary?
you don’t support women by erasing women, dude. “women are rarely seen” — uh, no. women are EVERYWHERE in space science. watch a documentary, they’re weighing black holes and mapping titan. look up the celebration photos from curiosity’s landing, count the happy, proud women who put that little robot on mars.
you will have to look at their faces, because they’re wearing the same clothes as the men. maybe that’s why you missed them.

Yes, women are rarely seen in science, but not because they are not there!
Even after women could finally officially be admitted to universities, their role in science was downplayed and kept out of the limelight, the focus (and the lens of the camera) kept on the male scientists. Not only that, the accolades for various discoveries would often go to male scientists regardless of who actually should have received credit for discovering/proving/researching any given subject.
Visibility is important, because it creates a certain image of science as a whole. If a staggering majority of photographs focuses on male scientists, all while putting women in the background, science will still be viewed as a boy’s club.
And as we can see on the above picture, women in science do not have to wear the same clothes as men; on the contrary - women would often dress the way women usually do. Yes, there are laboratories and safety regulations to consider, but not all science is done in a lab.
There are also uniforms, that’s true. That’s where the importance of focus comes into play.
Consider this photo:

I can find 8 women (there are even more) in this picture but only if I actively look for them in the background.
Now let’s look at this one:

Even though they are all wearing the same blue shirts and baggy trousers (though there is one woman in a smart skirt; you go, girl!), I have no problems seeing and locating women in this picture. There are seven of them standing in the first row, and the faces in the back are clearly visible.
Doing science while female is difficult enough, but doing it while feminine is sometimes downright impossible. The uniforms of the Curiosity crew above are not very feminine, and they were designed with a male “model” of science in mind. This is the US, and up above is India, a country usually not considered to be a very women-friendly place.
Visibility matters, and if we have to “look up” or check for something that we don’t see at first glance, then something has gone wrong. The picture of female Indian scientists celebrating their successful mission in feminine attires is important, as it puts women and femininity in the foreground. This is where those women belong, and this is where they should be portrayed.

jumpingjacktrash:

notyourexrotic:

This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

i love the photo, and congrats to these scientists, but wtf is with that commentary?

you don’t support women by erasing women, dude. “women are rarely seen” — uh, no. women are EVERYWHERE in space science. watch a documentary, they’re weighing black holes and mapping titan. look up the celebration photos from curiosity’s landing, count the happy, proud women who put that little robot on mars.

you will have to look at their faces, because they’re wearing the same clothes as the men. maybe that’s why you missed them.

Yes, women are rarely seen in science, but not because they are not there!

Even after women could finally officially be admitted to universities, their role in science was downplayed and kept out of the limelight, the focus (and the lens of the camera) kept on the male scientists. Not only that, the accolades for various discoveries would often go to male scientists regardless of who actually should have received credit for discovering/proving/researching any given subject.

Visibility is important, because it creates a certain image of science as a whole. If a staggering majority of photographs focuses on male scientists, all while putting women in the background, science will still be viewed as a boy’s club.

And as we can see on the above picture, women in science do not have to wear the same clothes as men; on the contrary - women would often dress the way women usually do. Yes, there are laboratories and safety regulations to consider, but not all science is done in a lab.

There are also uniforms, that’s true. That’s where the importance of focus comes into play.

Consider this photo:

I can find 8 women (there are even more) in this picture but only if I actively look for them in the background.

Now let’s look at this one:

Even though they are all wearing the same blue shirts and baggy trousers (though there is one woman in a smart skirt; you go, girl!), I have no problems seeing and locating women in this picture. There are seven of them standing in the first row, and the faces in the back are clearly visible.

Doing science while female is difficult enough, but doing it while feminine is sometimes downright impossible. The uniforms of the Curiosity crew above are not very feminine, and they were designed with a male “model” of science in mind. This is the US, and up above is India, a country usually not considered to be a very women-friendly place.

Visibility matters, and if we have to “look up” or check for something that we don’t see at first glance, then something has gone wrong. The picture of female Indian scientists celebrating their successful mission in feminine attires is important, as it puts women and femininity in the foreground. This is where those women belong, and this is where they should be portrayed.

— 10 hours ago with 25621 notes
duss005:

My NYCC exclusive variant cover to Scott Snyder and Jock’s new Image title WYTCHES. This book is going to be HUGE folks. Telling you right now. you can read a preview of it here for free- https://imagecomics.com/comics/releases/wytches-free-previewReally glad i was able to have a hand(s) in this launch.

duss005:

My NYCC exclusive variant cover to Scott Snyder and Jock’s new Image title WYTCHES. This book is going to be HUGE folks. Telling you right now. you can read a preview of it here for free- https://imagecomics.com/comics/releases/wytches-free-preview

Really glad i was able to have a hand(s) in this launch.

— 12 hours ago with 212 notes
tragedyseries:

Friends, readers and colleagues,
It is with surpassing pride and gladness that I can, at long last, show you the cover to the upcoming complete collection of this series and announce the first opportunity to pre-order an copy for your very own. The book will include every tragedy, a 22 page story written and drawn by me just for the collection along with additional illustrations and other exclusive content that will not be available online.If you have enjoyed the series thus far and would like to support it in a tangible way, it would be a great catalyst in the longterm potential success, proliferation and acceptance of this book in this wide, wild world of ours, if you would consider pre-ordering it from one of the following retailers:AmazonBarnes and NobleItunes/Ibooks
Please tell your friends, professors, pumpkins, pets and sworn enemies about it. I thank you for all the support, kindness and for the shared sense of comedy emerging from tragedy that we apparently share. Good day to you all.Most sincerely,BD

Hurrah~!

tragedyseries:

Friends, readers and colleagues,

It is with surpassing pride and gladness that I can, at long last, show you the cover to the upcoming complete collection of this series and announce the first opportunity to pre-order an copy for your very own. The book will include every tragedy, a 22 page story written and drawn by me just for the collection along with additional illustrations and other exclusive content that will not be available online.

If you have enjoyed the series thus far and would like to support it in a tangible way, it would be a great catalyst in the longterm potential success, proliferation and acceptance of this book in this wide, wild world of ours, if you would consider pre-ordering it from one of the following retailers:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Itunes/Ibooks

Please tell your friends, professors, pumpkins, pets and sworn enemies about it. I thank you for all the support, kindness and for the shared sense of comedy emerging from tragedy that we apparently share. Good day to you all.

Most sincerely,

BD

Hurrah~!

— 19 hours ago with 730 notes
vampire-the-masquerade:

essentialprocrastination:

vampire-the-masquerade:

gothiccharmschool:

annabellioncourt:

*inhuman vampiric crying sounds*

::incoherent Vampire Witch Queen screeching::

Oh dear….

When did *she* regain her sanity?!

In 2010 she renounced her religion via facebook (apparently, I checked literally once source, that’s what they said, and I’m too lazy to look into it any further), then wrote 2 werewolf novels, then in March of this year she declared she’d be going back to vampires.

Incredible!
When I was reading her books (I think it was in 2007 or 2008?), she’d already managed not only to to estrange most of her own fandom, but also to irk the general populace of fantasy fans something fierce. There was a rumour that she’d condemned her own works and said a few choice words about the people who read them.
The rumour, I find today, was not exactly true.
She was also quite infamous for banning any and all forms of fanfiction based on her works; this has apparently also changed, according to her Wikipedia page.

vampire-the-masquerade:

essentialprocrastination:

vampire-the-masquerade:

gothiccharmschool:

annabellioncourt:

*inhuman vampiric crying sounds*

::incoherent Vampire Witch Queen screeching::

Oh dear….

When did *she* regain her sanity?!

In 2010 she renounced her religion via facebook (apparently, I checked literally once source, that’s what they said, and I’m too lazy to look into it any further), then wrote 2 werewolf novels, then in March of this year she declared she’d be going back to vampires.

Incredible!

When I was reading her books (I think it was in 2007 or 2008?), she’d already managed not only to to estrange most of her own fandom, but also to irk the general populace of fantasy fans something fierce. There was a rumour that she’d condemned her own works and said a few choice words about the people who read them.

The rumour, I find today, was not exactly true.

She was also quite infamous for banning any and all forms of fanfiction based on her works; this has apparently also changed, according to her Wikipedia page.

(Source: facebook.com)

— 20 hours ago with 711 notes

pyralsnout:

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Pluto Tumblr Posts photoset

(You’re welcome)

OHANA MEANS FAMILY
VIVA LA PLUTO FUCK YOU

(via itsredrobinnotswanqueen)

— 20 hours ago with 164050 notes